Jim Larkin Saved Over 100,000 Unfairly Treated Workers

Jim Larkin was well known for his founding of Liverpool, England’s largest union. Learn more about Jim Larkin: http://www.rte.ie/centuryireland/index.php/articles/jim-larkin-released-from-prison and http://ireland-calling.com/james-larkin/

The Irish Transport and General Workers’ Union [ITGWU] was a key to helping over 100,000 industrial workers get their rights to fair employment in 1913. If it wasn’t for Jim Larkin’s militant approach within unions, this accomplishment may not have ever happened.

First off, Jim Larkin was born in Liverpool, England in 1876 within a pretty rough spot. In order for his family to survive, they needed Larkin’s support to work many odd jobs.

He would do so and this is when Larkin would find a path to work as a foreman at the Liverpool dock. This is where the saga begins.

Jim Larkin would join the National Union of Dock Labourers after noticing how the workers were getting mistreated. He would take his involvement a step further and participate full-time with the union as a trade-union organizer.

Things would go smoothly for Larkin until the union realized that Larkin’s militant attitude wasn’t gonna fly with the union and so they would transfer him to Dublin where this attitude would be more suitable. He would start the ITGWU soon after.

As the founder, he would put a demanding political program in place. This program would suggest a legal 8 hour work day, pensions for the elderly, opportunity for the unemployed, compulsory arbitration courts, adult suffrage, Nationalization of canal, and railways (along with other forms of transportation as well).

His primary goal was to unite Irish industrial workers into one huge organization that would get treated fairly as deserved. Read more: James Larkin | Biography and James Larkin – Wikipedia

Jim Larkin and over 100,000 workers would go on strike in 1913, which would be called the 1913 Dublin Lockout.

For eight months, these workers would refuse to work – due to mistreat – until they were granted their rights to fair employment. After the lengthly resist, the workers would win and be granted their rights to fair employment.

Jim Larkin was a hero to Irish industrial workers, providing a voice for their mistreat and power to act. On January 30, 1947, Larkin dies, but he will be forever remembered as the Irish labor organizer and activist who fought for fair treatment of Liverpool, England’s industrial skilled and unskilled workers and winning in the process.

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